Reproduction Curved Crown Moldings, for Queen Anne Residence.

That curved corner defines the look of the building.

That curved corner defines the look of the building.

Native Woods Restoration Carpentry of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania did the restoration of this 1880 Queen Anne residence. In particular, reproduction of these distinctive curved “ovolo” crown moldings required a great deal of patience. Period architects and carpenters were not afraid of the cost of such details because they understood how such forms defined the look and feel of the finished building. Still and all, it is a lot of work, as the images following clearly show. The entire cornice is built up out of a series of curved laminates, formed, fixed, glued and then sanded smooth. We have been sympathizing with the carpenters in their trials, but the masons, sheet metal workers (gutters!) and roofers experienced similar issues. Check out the bent glass in the corner windows. That said, was it worth it? Certainly that curved corner breaks every building rule, and makes a strong statement, similar to the way that some modern architectural forms are intended to do today. They make an impact, in other words, but not cheap to do.

Forcing the fascia board into place.

Forcing the fascia board into place.

Building up the ovolo.

Building up the ovolo.

Sanded smooth and primed.

Sanded smooth and primed.

A curved line, beautiful to look at.

A curved line, beautiful to look at.

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